Roe vs. Roe
By Norma McCorvey

Norma McCorvey, the plaintiff in the Roe v. Wade case that legalized abortion, who is now a pro-life Christian, tells her own story.

In 1969 I got pregnant with my third child. I didn't want to have it, didn't want it in my body. I wanted to kill it. I wanted to have an abortion. I went to an illegal abortion clinic in Dallas. I had $250 of my rent money saved up. There was nobody there. I went to this attorney and he treated me pretty much like a word that I can't say anymore. He said that he just knew of these two young law students who had just graduated college--Sarah Weddington and Linda Kaufman--and they were trying to challenge the Texas statute on abortion. I didn't have a clue what he was saying (but agreed to meet with them).

We sat and talked and drank beer for the longest time. We got kind of smashed. Then we had pizza. Then we drank some more beer. They started pounding me with all this, "Well, don't you think women should have the right to control their own body?"  They never said anything about -- It's really a baby, Norma. You're going to be killing your baby. Don't you know you're signing an affidavit to execute the next three generations of children to come? They didn't say anything like that. I didn't have a clue. I was ignorant. I mean, I was dumb! I thought they could help me. Sarah said she was going to call a doctor friend of hers. I knew it wasn't ever going to happen, 'cause I knew she wasn't gonna keep her word. You know things like that.

I gave birth to my third baby June 2, 1970. The baby had been born maybe four months and Sarah called and said she was going to the Supreme Court of the United States and that she wanted to talk to me. --Would I like to go to Washington?-- Excuse me, Sarah, but I had the baby. I had my baby, man, and she wasn't there. She said she'd be there. She said she'd take care of it. She said everything was going to be okay.
She wasn't there. Things weren't alright. Things got progressively worse and worse and worse. It was smoke pot, drop acid--do anything you could get your hands on. It was pretty much how I wanted to stay all the time. Just stoned. Don't think. Don't eat. Don't act. You don't even have to breathe because it hurts too bad. 

It might have been victory for Weddington, Kaufman and all the other pro-aborts, but it was shame for me. The definition for abortion hit me in the face. I could see little babies being pulled out of their mamas, but they were alive. That's what I lived with for the better part of 14 years.

I suddenly realized that it was a child. It wasn't tissue--it wasn't a lump. Plus I had worked in an abortion clinic. And I had seen the freezer of dead babies. They had wanted to change a law. They said, "Norma, don't you want to exercise your rights by having control over your own body?" "Yes," I said. "Well, all you have to do is sign on the dotted line." I signed it, and became "Jane Roe."

That's sad to think that the next three generations that come after you are being aborted. That is nothing to be proud of.

The Conversion
Norma worked in a Texas abortion center.
It didn't make any difference to the pro-lifers gathered there how much I stayed out in front of the mill, how much I cussed them, how much I screamed at them. They would just look at me and smile. That was tough.
Pastor Flip Benham, who had greatly hurt Norma's feelings with something he said to her, returned to the abortion center where she worked to speak with her alone and apologize and tell her that God loved her.
After that talk, I went back into the mill and I went into my office and I closed my door and I turned off my lights and I cried. And I thought to myself, "If this big, bad, radical man of God can come to me, little insignificant me, and say, 'I'm sorry. I was out of line' and mean it"-- That got me. 
A little girl named Emily, who prayed with her mother for Norma on the way to school each morning invited her to church.
I said, "I don't know, Miss Emily. Let Miss Norma think about it for a while and I'll give you my answer." She said, "I would love to have you there. Pleeeease?" How can you refuse an 8 year old?
Norma did go to church with Emily and her family and became a Christian.
I just started praying to God to ask Him to forgive me for helping Weddington with the abortion, with all the Roe v. Wade stuff. Then I wrote "Empty Playgrounds." 
Emily, who invited Norma to church, had herself been a product of an unwanted pregnancy. Emily's mother had been greatly pressured to abort eight years earlier, when the father of the child and his family wanted to hide the pregnancy.
The pro-lifers here have shown me what it's like to be a human being for the first time of my life. They've loved me. They've nurtured me. They've cared for me. I've never felt so good about being a woman--about just being a person--than I have from these people.

I'm a "Jesus freak" now. It's the best thing in the world that could ever happen to a young woman--to love God and love His word and to be His servant.

It has to be known that abortion is one of the worst holocausts that the world has ever seen. People misunderstand that it's not "my body, my choice, my rights." It's the taking of the life implanted in a woman's womb and life should never be stopped.

Norma's plaque at the National Memorial for the Unborn reads:
"I AM NORMA MCCORVEY. I BECAME KNOWN AS JANE ROE ON JANUARY 22, 1973, WHEN THE U.S. SUPREME COURT RELEASED THE ROE V. WADE DECISION WHICH CREATED A WOMAN'S 'RIGHT TO ABORTION.'
"I AM NOW A CHILD OF GOD, A NEW CREATURE IN CHRIST; I AM FORGIVEN AND REDEEMED.
"TODAY, I PUBLICLY RECANT MY INVOLVEMENT IN THE TRAGEDY OF ABORTION. I HUMBLY ASK FORGIVENESS OF THE MILLIONS OF WOMEN AND UNBORN BABIES WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED THE VIOLENCE OF ABORTION.
"IN THIS PLACE OF HEALING, THE NATIONAL MEMORIAL FOR THE UNBORN, I STAND WITH THOSE WHO HONOR THE WORTH OF EVERY UNBORN CHILD AS CREATED IN THE IMAGE OF GOD. I WILL STRIVE, IN THE NAME OF JESUS, TO END THIS HOLOCAUST."
-NORMA MCCORVEY, MARCH 23, 1997